Hunting Big Sales with Tom Searcy

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7 Expert Tips for Better Conversations

When you mention the qualities you look for in great salespeople, it’s nearly a given that the gift of gab is near the top of the list. Everyone loves a salesperson who can carry a conversation. But in speaking with Brenda Bence, author of Would You Want to Work for You?, I was reminded the ability to listen may be more important. 

Bence shared an interesting statistic, which is that English speakers can say 125 to 150 words in a given minute and listen to 400 to 550 words in the same amount of time. The old adage goes that he who speaks first loses. To be a great salesperson you have to listen, but are you doing it effectively? Bence devised an acronymn called I.L.I.S.T.E.N., listing seven steps to consider when you’re on the receiving end of a conversation. They are: 

I. Intention

Learn the benefits of listening. You’re in the conversation for a reason, so make it your goal to stay involved.

L. Landscape

Meet in an environment that is conducive to listening. Make sure it’s a quiet place and hang up the “Do not Disturb” sign if need be. 

I. Impartiality

Don’t come into the conversation with a preconceived notion of what you’ll discuss. Allow it to flow and listen with curiosity.

S. Safeguard

Like landscape, this is all about staying in the moment. Rid yourself of distractions such as social media and phone calls. 

T. Target

Now that you’re in the right place, it’s time to get hyper-focused.

Posted by Tom Searcy in Inc.com.

7 Expert Tips for Better Conversations

When you mention the qualities you look for in great salespeople, it’s nearly a given that the gift of gab is near the top of the list. Everyone loves a salesperson who can carry a conversation. But in speaking with Brenda Bence, author of Would You Want to Work for You?, I was reminded the ability to listen may be more important. 

Bence shared an interesting statistic, which is that English speakers can say 125 to 150 words in a given minute and listen to 400 to 550 words in the same amount of time. The old adage goes that he who speaks first loses. To be a great salesperson you have to listen, but are you doing it effectively? Bence devised an acronymn called I.L.I.S.T.E.N., listing seven steps to consider when you’re on the receiving end of a conversation. They are: 

I. Intention

Learn the benefits of listening. You’re in the conversation for a reason, so make it your goal to stay involved.

L. Landscape

Meet in an environment that is conducive to listening. Make sure it’s a quiet place and hang up the “Do not Disturb” sign if need be. 

I. Impartiality

Don’t come into the conversation with a preconceived notion of what you’ll discuss. Allow it to flow and listen with curiosity.

S. Safeguard

Like landscape, this is all about staying in the moment. Rid yourself of distractions such as social media and phone calls. 

T. Target

Now that you’re in the right place, it’s time to get hyper-focused.

Posted by Tom Searcy in Inc.com.

7 Expert Tips for Better Conversations

When you mention the qualities you look for in great salespeople, it’s nearly a given that the gift of gab is near the top of the list. Everyone loves a salesperson who can carry a conversation. But in speaking with Brenda Bence, author of Would You Want to Work for You?, I was reminded the ability to listen may be more important. 

Bence shared an interesting statistic, which is that English speakers can say 125 to 150 words in a given minute and listen to 400 to 550 words in the same amount of time. The old adage goes that he who speaks first loses. To be a great salesperson you have to listen, but are you doing it effectively? Bence devised an acronymn called I.L.I.S.T.E.N., listing seven steps to consider when you’re on the receiving end of a conversation. They are: 

I. Intention

Learn the benefits of listening. You’re in the conversation for a reason, so make it your goal to stay involved.

L. Landscape

Meet in an environment that is conducive to listening. Make sure it’s a quiet place and hang up the “Do not Disturb” sign if need be. 

I. Impartiality

Don’t come into the conversation with a preconceived notion of what you’ll discuss. Allow it to flow and listen with curiosity.

S. Safeguard

Like landscape, this is all about staying in the moment. Rid yourself of distractions such as social media and phone calls. 

T. Target

Now that you’re in the right place, it’s time to get hyper-focused.

Posted by Tom Searcy in Inc.com.

4 Unexpected (and Easy) Ways to Build Resilience

Recently I spoke with author and sports psychology coach Dr. Rob Bell. In Bell’s new book, The Hinge: The Importance of Mental Toughness, he gathers stories and philosophy about recognizing those crucial life-changing moments and having the resilience it takes to deal with them.

What’s a hinge, you might ask? Very simple. If you look at life as a door, a hinge is what makes the door work. A hinge can be anything: a moment, an event, or a person who makes a difference in our lives. A hinge can range from the tragic to the heroic, and from a brief encounter to a lifelong companionship. But the most important thing about hinges is that people typically don’t see them coming and are often unprepared for the changes they will effect.

This is where the philosophy of resilience comes into play. Resilience is a skill no one is really born with but can develop through experience or by training his or her brain. Here, then, are four tips to help you build your own mental toughness:

1. Hold on to your scars

Knowing where every scar came from means having lessons from those moments to guide you. When you deny your failures, you lose those lessons, because failure is the best teacher.

2. Discipline occurs daily

The greats didn’t get that way by just being lucky. As Aristotle said, “We are what we repeatedly do.” Truly successful people, then, are aware of their commitment to excellence, and this discipline helps them find those hinge moments to build on.

Posted by Tom Searcy in Inc.com.

4 Unexpected (and Easy) Ways to Build Resilience

Recently I spoke with author and sports psychology coach Dr. Rob Bell. In Bell’s new book, The Hinge: The Importance of Mental Toughness, he gathers stories and philosophy about recognizing those crucial life-changing moments and having the resilience it takes to deal with them.

What’s a hinge, you might ask? Very simple. If you look at life as a door, a hinge is what makes the door work. A hinge can be anything: a moment, an event, or a person who makes a difference in our lives. A hinge can range from the tragic to the heroic, and from a brief encounter to a lifelong companionship. But the most important thing about hinges is that people typically don’t see them coming and are often unprepared for the changes they will effect.

This is where the philosophy of resilience comes into play. Resilience is a skill no one is really born with but can develop through experience or by training his or her brain. Here, then, are four tips to help you build your own mental toughness:

1. Hold on to your scars

Knowing where every scar came from means having lessons from those moments to guide you. When you deny your failures, you lose those lessons, because failure is the best teacher.

2. Discipline occurs daily

The greats didn’t get that way by just being lucky. As Aristotle said, “We are what we repeatedly do.” Truly successful people, then, are aware of their commitment to excellence, and this discipline helps them find those hinge moments to build on.

Posted by Tom Searcy in Inc.com.

4 Unexpected (and Easy) Ways to Build Resilience

Recently I spoke with author and sports psychology coach Dr. Rob Bell. In Bell’s new book, The Hinge: The Importance of Mental Toughness, he gathers stories and philosophy about recognizing those crucial life-changing moments and having the resilience it takes to deal with them.

What’s a hinge, you might ask? Very simple. If you look at life as a door, a hinge is what makes the door work. A hinge can be anything: a moment, an event, or a person who makes a difference in our lives. A hinge can range from the tragic to the heroic, and from a brief encounter to a lifelong companionship. But the most important thing about hinges is that people typically don’t see them coming and are often unprepared for the changes they will effect.

This is where the philosophy of resilience comes into play. Resilience is a skill no one is really born with but can develop through experience or by training his or her brain. Here, then, are four tips to help you build your own mental toughness:

1. Hold on to your scars

Knowing where every scar came from means having lessons from those moments to guide you. When you deny your failures, you lose those lessons, because failure is the best teacher.

2. Discipline occurs daily

The greats didn’t get that way by just being lucky. As Aristotle said, “We are what we repeatedly do.” Truly successful people, then, are aware of their commitment to excellence, and this discipline helps them find those hinge moments to build on.

Posted by Tom Searcy in Inc.com.

5 Steps to Solid Strategic Planning

I recently had the pleasure of speaking with John Myrna about his new book The Chemistry of Strategy. We discussed what it means to have a strategy and why a strategic plan is differs from an operational plan.

Myrna defines business strategy as “knowing what you want to be in the future, where you are today, and what your annual strategic goals are, so that you’ll change from who you are to who you want to become.”

Your strategy must be set forth in attainable, measurable goals, which means being specific is a must. It’s also important to know the difference between an operational goal, which by and large lives in the here and now, and a strategic one, which resides in the future. Here, Myrna shares five ways to implement a business strategy and carve your path to the future:

Make a pledge

Get together with your team and make a simple pledge regarding your goals. Say it aloud, together: “We commit to this plan.” 

Gather your team

Meet with your executive council to manage this plan. When rounding out your team, keep in mind they must be able to visualize and help realize goals. They should intend on being there whether the goal is met or not, and they need to be diverse, both in experience and in passions. These are the people who will ensure your entire team buys into this plan, because a true strategic goal affects your whole company, from top to bottom. 

Outline a process

A good strategic plan isn’t a one-day thing.

Posted by Tom Searcy in Inc.com.

5 Steps to Strategic Planning

I recently had the pleasure of speaking with John Myrna about his new book The Chemistry of Strategy. We discussed what it means to have a strategy and why a strategic plan is differs from an operational plan.

Myrna defines business strategy as “knowing what you want to be in the future, where you are today, and what your annual strategic goals are, so that you’ll change from who you are to who you want to become.”

Your strategy must be set forth in attainable, measurable goals, which means being specific is a must. It’s also important to know the difference between an operational goal, which by and large lives in the here and now, and a strategic one, which resides in the future. Here, Myrna shares five ways to implement a business strategy and carve your path to the future:

Make a pledge

Get together with your team and make a simple pledge regarding your goals. Say it aloud, together: “We commit to this plan.” 

Gather your team

Meet with your executive council to manage this plan. When rounding out your team, keep in mind they must be able to visualize and help realize goals. They should intend on being there whether the goal is met or not, and they need to be diverse, both in experience and in passions. These are the people who will ensure your entire team buys into this plan, because a true strategic goal affects your whole company, from top to bottom. 

Outline a process

A good strategic plan isn’t a one-day thing.

Posted by Tom Searcy in Inc.com.

5 Steps to Strategic Planning

I recently had the pleasure of speaking with John Myrna about his new book The Chemistry of Strategy. We discussed what it means to have a strategy and why a strategic plan is differs from an operational plan.

Myrna defines business strategy as “knowing what you want to be in the future, where you are today, and what your annual strategic goals are, so that you’ll change from who you are to who you want to become.”

Your strategy must be set forth in attainable, measurable goals, which means being specific is a must. It’s also important to know the difference between an operational goal, which by and large lives in the here and now, and a strategic one, which resides in the future. Here, Myrna shares five ways to implement a business strategy and carve your path to the future:

Make a pledge

Get together with your team and make a simple pledge regarding your goals. Say it aloud, together: “We commit to this plan.” 

Gather your team

Meet with your executive council to manage this plan. When rounding out your team, keep in mind they must be able to visualize and help realize goals. They should intend on being there whether the goal is met or not, and they need to be diverse, both in experience and in passions. These are the people who will ensure your entire team buys into this plan, because a true strategic goal affects your whole company, from top to bottom. 

Outline a process

A good strategic plan isn’t a one-day thing.

Posted by Tom Searcy in Inc.com.

5 Steps to Strategic Planning

I recently had the pleasure of speaking with John Myrna about his new book The Chemistry of Strategy. We discussed what it means to have a strategy and why a strategic plan is differs from an operational plan.

Myrna defines business strategy as “knowing what you want to be in the future, where you are today, and what your annual strategic goals are, so that you’ll change from who you are to who you want to become.”

Your strategy must be set forth in attainable, measurable goals, which means being specific is a must. It’s also important to know the difference between an operational goal, which by and large lives in the here and now, and a strategic one, which resides in the future. Here, Myrna shares five ways to implement a business strategy and carve your path to the future:

Make a pledge

Get together with your team and make a simple pledge regarding your goals. Say it aloud, together: “We commit to this plan.” 

Gather your team

Meet with your executive council to manage this plan. When rounding out your team, keep in mind they must be able to visualize and help realize goals. They should intend on being there whether the goal is met or not, and they need to be diverse, both in experience and in passions. These are the people who will ensure your entire team buys into this plan, because a true strategic goal affects your whole company, from top to bottom. 

Outline a process

A good strategic plan isn’t a one-day thing.

Posted by Tom Searcy in Inc.com.